Panama’s Mossack Fonseca Data Leak: What’s the Scoop? What we know Rightfully nicknamed “the biggest data leak in history,” this leak externalized 11.5 Million documents and 2.6 terabytes of confidential…

Panama’s Mossack Fonseca Data Leak: What’s the Scoop?

Michal Ferguson

As Director of Inbound Marketing, Michal thinks and breathes content - striving to get our community of cloud security professionals just enough information to become rock stars in their own organizations.

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What we know

Rightfully nicknamed “the biggest data leak in history,” this leak externalized 11.5 Million documents and 2.6 terabytes of confidential information from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm. Specifically, the Panamanian law firm sells rights to anonymous offshore companies around the world, a grey zone that may enable their owners to cover up their business dealings.

To put things in perspective, this leak is larger than the US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks in 2010, and the secret intelligence documents given to journalists by Edward Snowden in 2013 combined. The data covers a period spanning from the 1970s to the spring of 2016, including records from offshore bank accounts of some of the world’s wealthiest people – including politicians, athletes and business moguls.

Interestingly, the anonymous insider who leaked the data wanted no financial compensation in return.

What we want to know

Though a highly contested topic, the cybersecurity implications are still interesting.

  • How did the anonymous source get their hands on such a massive volume of data?
  • How were they able to externalize it with no audit trail?
  • Where did the data reside? Did any of it live in the cloud?
  • Who from inside Mossack Fonseca had control over it?

And most importantly, could the organization have seen any signs of unusual or inappropriate user behavior that would have prevented or limited the scope of this data breach?

In its latest cybersecurity report, the CloudLock CyberLab found top cyber offenders download 227x more files than the average user. In the context of the cloud, finding such unusual, suspicious behavior is key to pinpointing and mitigating cyber threat.

Preventing Data Leaks: Suspicious User Behaviors to Focus On

Read the CloudLock cybersecurity report to gain practical, actionable insights and tips to help your security team make the most of their cybersecurity efforts. Take advantage of the new Cloud Threat Funnel methodology to help pinpoint true threat in a sea of billions of user activities.

The Cloud Threat Funnel: Suspicious User Behavior That Matters

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