Cloud Security News: Week in Review January 27th, 2017 Edition Cloud Security News: Week in Review is our blog series, grabbing the more interesting cloud security scoops from the web. Sit back,…

Cloud Security News: Week in Review January 27th, 2017 Edition

Alex O'Connor

As Marketing Specialist, Alex works on all things digital and creative, striving to successfully drive CloudLock’s marketing campaigns.

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Cloud Security News: Week in Review is our blog series, grabbing the more interesting cloud security scoops from the web. Sit back, relax, and catch up on all you should know about this week.

Unfortunately, ransomware does not appear to be letting up in the new year. There are two new types of ransomware, albeit unrelated, recently uncovered that you should be aware of. It has also been discovered that banks in the UK were subject to a massive DDoS attack two weeks ago. Lastly, back to the popular topic of ransomware; this time about a new variety that may not be what it seems. Read below for more details.

Threatpost: Sage and Satan Ransomware, Double Trouble

By Michael Mimoso (@Mike_Mimoso)

2017, meet “Sage,” a variation of CryLocker ransomware. The victim receives an email without a subject line or body, but rather just two .zip file attachments. *Spidey senses should be tingling at this point* Upon opening the files, the prey will find a Word doc containing a malicious macro or a .js file, either of which will download and get to work infecting the system. Also meet “Satan,” a ransomware kit that lets hackers customize the malware – from choosing their own ransom demands, to putting a multiplier in place to coincide with number of days of non-payment.

Computer Weekly: Lloyds Bank hit by massive DDoS attack

By Warwick Ashford (@Warwick_Ashford)

Do you live in the UK and use Lloyds, Halifax, or Bank of Scotland? If you experienced trouble with your online banking services a few weeks ago, here’s why. According to the reports, this attack was initiated by an international cybercrime group and it was only a subset of a larger DDoS initiative. During the attack, customers weren’t allowed to check their balances or make online payments. Fortunately, no money was stolen from any of the affected online customers.

ZDNet: This new ransomware ‘bluff’ trick is costing victims big, even though their files are never really in danger

By Danny Palmer (@dannyjpalmer)

Introducing ‘bluff’ ransomware. Victims of these fake attacks are shown a message notifying them that their files have been encrypted and that they need to pay up in order to get access back. Only, unbeknownst to the unfortunate target, their files have not in fact been encrypted. According to reports, approximately 66% of these victims end up paying the ransom. Who would have thought cybercriminals are capable of lying in such a way?

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